For Tohi

Born into a mystical place of she-wolves, Tohi was granted one wish from her sungod.

And so it was that she arrived in a New World. She watched humanoids thrash in cold waters, struggling to reach land. Found walls with no doors. Saw fences and miles of barbed wire, shredding dreams to shards of despair.

Tohi wept, tears that grew from soft rains to rivers of grief. Graveyard plots grew in numbers and the ground was sodden until it could hold no more. And she became the final witness, as this New World became the Last.

Weep for your children
for they see the hatred sown
and will reap its fruit.

barbed2bwire2bprompt1

The first three paragraphs are written for Friday Fictioneers, hosted each week by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. She provides a photo prompt and asks that folks create a story, flash fiction, in 100 words or less (word count: 96).  The haiku that concludes the post is written for NaPoWriMo day 23.  Taken together, prose + haiku, they become a haibun.  Tohi is the Cherokee word for peace. Photo Credit: Madison Woods.

15 thoughts on “For Tohi

  1. Björn Rudberg (brudberg) April 23, 2016 / 3:57 pm

    I love the mythical approach here Lilian… haibun is such a great way to express the pain. I can just imagine divine tears for our behavior…

    “Oh I pity men”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. madamewriter April 23, 2016 / 7:05 pm

    Beautiful word selections with vivid imagery. Well done! The haiku fits perfectly.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian April 24, 2016 / 8:06 am

      Thank you, Liz. Love your response here! Smiling I am.

      Like

  3. rochellewisoff April 24, 2016 / 4:55 pm

    Dear Lillian,

    I love the mystical, otherworldly feel to this. The haiku is a nice touch and seriously would’ve stood alone as a FF piece.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian April 24, 2016 / 5:26 pm

      Thank you, Rochelle. And once again, thank you for your dedication to Friday Fictioneers! It is appreciated by many.

      Like

  4. ansumani April 25, 2016 / 8:57 am

    The Haiku was beautiful and the contrast with the message’s bleak and sad theme made it more powerful. Well Done.

    Like

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