Romantic Tryst

Come walk with me, my dearest love,
through verdant fields, blue skies above.
Your hand in mine, without its glove,
I lust there of. I lust there of.

We stop to rest midst blooms divine,
wild flowers witness as we recline.
My lips seek yours, as if fine wine,
wouldst thou be mine? Wouldst thou be mine?

Written for dVerse, the virtual pub for poets where today Grace asks us to write a monotetra. This is a form developed by Michael Walker consisting of 1 or more quatrains. Each of the 4 lines in the quatrain must have 8 syllables. The four lines all carry the same end rhyme but the fourth line repeats the first four exact syllables twice and in both cases, the 4th syllable must have the end rhyme. So the rhyme scheme/poem’s structure looks like this:
First or only Quatrain
Line 1: 8 syllables, A1 (in my poem above “love)
Line 2: 8 syllables, A2 (in my poem above “above”)
Line 3: 8 syllables, A3 (in my poem above “glove”)
Line 4: 4 syllables A4 (“I lust there of”), 4 syllables A4


Second Quatrain
Line 1: 8 syllables, B1 (divine)
Line 2: 8 syllables, B2 (recline)
Line 3: 8 syllables, B3 (wine)
Line 4: 4 syllables B4 (wouldst thou be mine?), 4 syllables B4

Photo is from our trip to Ireland some years ago.