Waiting for Spring Tending

The small San Diego garden plot lies waiting. Remains stripped bare from summer past. Green straggling leggy vines meander over and under blunt-cut branches of a now anonymous plant. Dried tall corn stalks stand in leaning stance, blown by winds or simply bent from lack of care once the cobs were picked.

Long woody stems are capped by dry flower tops, their name a mystery to me. Brown scaled outer shell still holds tight to popped open pods. Each pod is perhaps six inches across and contains what looks like spiderweb short wisps of silken threads. I am smitten by these long-past-their-prime blooms and try to capture their beauty in photos – some in monotone black and white, others in their natural earth like tones. I am sad to know these plants, beautiful in their drying state, will soon be cleared as new seed is sown.

migratory bird
transports dried seed in plumage
beauty travels far

Photos taken Saturday, on a walk through the beautiful campus of San Diego State University. We came upon a small garden plot by the art buildings. It was obviously left untended until spring, when it will be cleared and replanted.

Written for Haibun Monday at dVerse, the virtual pub for poets. Today Frank asks us to write about the coming spring. Haibun: two or three tight paragraphs of prose (must be true) followed by a haiku that invokes a season. 

30 thoughts on “Waiting for Spring Tending

  1. sarahsouthwest February 3, 2020 / 3:06 pm

    Trust you to notice beauty in the disregarded, Lillian! Such wonderful photographs. Beauty certainly does travel far.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:04 pm

      Thank you, Sarah. I was truly just fascinated by this plant! 🙂

      Like

  2. kim881 February 3, 2020 / 3:16 pm

    Wonderful photos, Lill! It’s great to read your haibun, which has transported me to San Diego and the garden plot. I love the way you describe the dried tall corn stalks and the pods on the mystery plant. Beauty does indeed travel far – through your words and images.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:05 pm

      Thank you for such a wonderfully kind comment here, Kim. I really was fascinated with this little garden plot and its remains.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. rothpoetry February 3, 2020 / 3:24 pm

    Beautiful shots Lillian. Love the description of the garden and the seeds.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Björn Rudberg (brudberg) February 3, 2020 / 3:50 pm

    I think the intricacy of a seed-pod is something we often overlook and knowing how the seeds that will be bloom in spring and summer to come…

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:06 pm

      It was really beautiful – especially when you look closely!

      Like

  5. Beverly Crawford February 3, 2020 / 4:26 pm

    I enjoyed the visit to the garden. The plant you describe reminds me of milkweed, whose pods open to dandelion-like seeds which spread to the four winds!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:08 pm

      I agree….saw milkweed often when we lived in Iowa….it is much smaller and is pointed at the top of the pod as I recall. This had the shape of a sun flower but it wasn’t. Thus – a mystery flower!

      Like

  6. Glenn A. Buttkus February 3, 2020 / 4:33 pm

    Terrific haibun, lovely haiku, and fantastic photos; wonderful sense of place, vigorous with detail.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:08 pm

      Thank you thank you, Glenn! 🙂 So good to see you here today….maybe just my not being here every single time lately, but I’ve missed you?

      Like

  7. kanzensakura February 3, 2020 / 5:18 pm

    How glorious to find the vestiges of dead flowers. Yes indeed, beauty does travel far. I cleared off the ghosts of my garden this past weekend when it was warm. The bees are buzzing and want out of their hive!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:09 pm

      I LOVED the idea of you with a stethoscope listening to the hive 🙂

      Like

  8. Frank J. Tassone February 3, 2020 / 5:45 pm

    I love the imagistic way in which you tell the story of these passing flowers. Combined with your photos, and what a sublime delight your haibun is!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:10 pm

      Thank you, Frank! So very glad you enjoyed….I really enjoyed taking the photos!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. lynn__ February 3, 2020 / 10:06 pm

    You’ve captured the beauty of garden’s remnants with your words and photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:10 pm

      Sometimes the garden’s remains can be as beautiful, but in a different way, than when it is bursting with flowers, fruits and vegetables!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. oldegg February 4, 2020 / 12:17 am

    Looks like the seeds parachutes will carry them far from Mum! Spring is always a delight isn’t it?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Gina February 4, 2020 / 6:51 am

    i feel the solemn reverie for the long tall and now soon to be forgotten plants, you bade them such a sweet farewell. i so love your haiku, one of those that just stick to the tongue like caramel.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:12 pm

      Oh my…..I must remember that line…..sticking to the tongue like caramel! Now I’m hungry for a treat! 🙂 Reminds me of taffy apples that I used to enjoy in my youth 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Sherry Marr February 4, 2020 / 1:03 pm

    I am smitten, too, by those dried fluffy tops. I love your description. On the West Coast, our temperatures are mild, and I am rather amazed at all the green things poking their heads up on my balcony. It feels too early, as it is still snowing not too far from here. Still, I am excited to see them!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:14 pm

      Oh yes….we spent many years in Iowa and since 1997 in Boston….here in San Diego now for 2+ months avoiding Boston’s winter. I remember the beautiful crocus poking out their heads only to be met far too often with a light covering of snow, winter’s last hurrah. I always imagined the shivering!

      Like

  13. merrildsmith February 4, 2020 / 4:15 pm

    There is something beautiful about those dried feathery seeds. Wonderful photos. I like the thought of them traveling far with birds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian February 5, 2020 / 12:15 pm

      As you can tell with how many photos I took, I was just enthralled with this plant! I couldn’t figure out what it was though…it had the height and look of a sunflower but I’m sure it wasn’t.

      Liked by 1 person

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