The Tear Drop

i.
If you insist, turn a deaf ear.
Tear thread by thread
cherished maxims from the cloak of civility.
Ye shall find a skeleton of pock marked bones
bereft of tear drops, wallowing in dust.

ii.
Some denigrate her promise,
hurl angry words upon that ancient crown.
All who first sailed round her base, forgotten,
as the brazen would douse her torch of hope.
She stands sentinel ‘neath a sliver moon,
solitary tear drop rung from stone
frozen on sculpted cheek.

iii.
Violence rips across city streets
sirens scream and echo through news.
Voices raise, fists raise,
and mothers fall on knees.
Not one tear drop falls,
it is a deluge that turns spilled blood
into rivers of salted red.

iv.
A tear drop
is the same color,
no matter the skin.

statue-of-liberty-in-tears2-0
Bjorn is hosting dVerse today and uniquely is adapting the cubist movement in art to the art ofpoetry. He asks to to select a simple object, or common concept, and write several poems looking at it from different perpectives. Ultimately, we are to place the poems in an order to create contrasts and, when read together, form one poem.  Individual parts – also to be read as a whole.
I’ve chosen to write about the tear drop.

40 thoughts on “The Tear Drop

  1. whimsygizmo September 29, 2016 / 7:34 pm

    Heading back up for a delightful second read…but the use of tear/tear here is WONDERFUL.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:29 am

      Out of town since Thursday so just getting to lots of reading and posting! 🙂 So glad you enjoyed — I really enjoyed this prompt — so unique and really interesting to read different ideas from different perspectives.

      Like

  2. hayesspencer September 29, 2016 / 7:46 pm

    Wonderful poem! I love the last verse of this. So very true. Tears know no skin color, sex, or age.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:30 am

      Thank you. I am struck these days with so much news and so many words of division — it is nice to think of sameness.

      Like

      • hayesspencer October 10, 2016 / 5:25 pm

        Yes. It is. And the steadfast love of God and the power of prayer.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Brian September 29, 2016 / 8:11 pm

    The tear tears from eyes brought on by ignorance and hate. Well done poem.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:31 am

      Thank you, Brian. The news — the divisive words — I crave gentility and sameness.

      Like

  4. Victoria C. Slotto September 29, 2016 / 8:18 pm

    Oh, Lillian–this is so touching. I figured out “who” you were writing of on the 2nd stanza…this brings me close to tears.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:32 am

      What does the plaque say….bring me your tired, your poor…the huddled masses…
      I have no doubt that if statues could cry, there would indeed be a tear on the eye of the Statue of Liberty these days with all of the divisiveness and the “wall” talk. Empathy seems to be missing from so many these days.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. frankhubeny September 29, 2016 / 9:53 pm

    I liked the idea in part 4 about the tear drop being the same color no matter the skin. It is transparent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:33 am

      Yes it is —- and tears are being shed by so many today in a world that is trying to emphasize divisiveness. They say the smile is a universal language — I also be the tear can be be described in the same way.

      Like

  6. Björn Rudberg (brudberg) September 30, 2016 / 12:23 am

    Yes I do love the exploration of tears, and how you have varied and extended the thoughts in various directions. The pock marked bones and those dried tears are almost the hardest, and when stuck against that maxim in the fourth becomes such a strong image.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:35 am

      Thank you, Bjorn. Gone out of town since Thursday — just getting to my reading and posting. I so enjoyed this prompt of yours — seeing one thing from many perspectives. Looking at the tear fall, drop, tear asunder….

      Like

  7. kim881 September 30, 2016 / 3:04 am

    I had to read your poem several times, Lillian. The first time around I got hung up on the first stanza – couldn’t move on from the lines:
    ‘Ye shall find a skeleton of pock marked bones
    bereft of tear drops, wallowing in dust.’
    The second time I couldn’t get past number 3 and that ‘deluge that turns spilled blood /
    into rivers of salted red’.
    You have concluded this hard-hitting teardrop beautifully.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:38 am

      Thank you, Kim….for the very thoughtful read and response. Truly appreciated. I am just returned from traveling since Thursday so catching up with prompts and reading and posting. I so enjoyed Bjorn’s prompt regarding a cubist approach to writing. Seeing one item from different perspectives — it really widens our views, our thoughts, our sensitivity.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:39 am

      I hadn’t thought of it that way….a wise calm that recognizes the sameness in all of us. That is juxtaposed to the vitriolic words of hatred and divisiness spewed forth by too many in history and right up through today. Calm, thoughtful, compassionate………a tear is the same for all.

      Like

  8. Sanaa Rizvi September 30, 2016 / 6:41 am

    ‘A tear drop is the same color, no matter the skin’ sigh.. this is so very beautiful, poignant and wise ❤️

    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

    Like

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:40 am

      Thank you, Sanaa. I’m glad you enjoyed.

      Like

  9. Grace September 30, 2016 / 12:45 pm

    The last one stands out for me and brings home your message Lillian ~ Very moving share ~

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:40 am

      Thank you, Grace. A mother’s grief is the same world wide. And seen too often these days.

      Like

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:41 am

      Clout — now that’s a new word for me! 🙂 Thanks, Walter…glad you enjoyed.

      Like

  10. kanzensakura October 1, 2016 / 7:24 pm

    Yes indeed. The tears are all the same color regardless. I read this several times, each time with a different meaning. Wonderful poem, excellent form.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:42 am

      Yes — layers here. I so enjoyed the cubist prompt — it reminds me that looking at one thing from different perspectives can give us a richess of meaning — if only we are open to it. Tears that fall, drop, and tear assunder.

      Like

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:43 am

      Thank you…….I really enjoyed this challenge of looking at one thing from many perspectives. It’s like taking an object and turning it over in your hands, slowly, and slower still. Seeing each angle and shadow. I’m glad you connected with this one and appreciate your reply.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. kaykuala (@hankkaykuala) October 1, 2016 / 11:43 pm

    A tear drop
    is the same color,
    no matter the skin.

    Classic observation lillian! But those who wield power seems to think that there are such a thing as sub-humans in European ghettos prior to WWarII and in the present refugee camps. Their yearnings and tears are just the same but not acknowledged as such.

    Hank

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:45 am

      I became so involved with this prompt…..then left for NC on Thursday early and did not have a chance to get back to people’s views. Thank you so very much, Freya. I’m glad you enjoyed. I found it fascinating to think about a cubist approach to art — to seeing — to using words….turning them over and over and seeing different meanings and applications. Tears falling, dropping, and tearing assunder.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian October 4, 2016 / 10:46 am

      Thank you! So glad you enjoyed. Tipping my very late morning coffee to you this morning 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. dan4kent January 28, 2017 / 3:49 pm

    Quiet as it is brilliant for the depth on which she stands. Good stuff!
    Dan, your newest fan in Chicago.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian January 30, 2017 / 10:23 am

      Nice to meet you Dan! I grew up in Waukegan, Illinois; my hubby in Chicago. One the land of Jack Benny, the other the Windy City that, in my opinion, is one of the architectural gems of the US.
      Glad you enjoyed this post!

      Like

      • dan4kent January 30, 2017 / 7:42 pm

        Likewise. I did. Growing up in farm country, i promised myself that someday I’d live where the glow on the horizon was. I do. Love this city!
        But the real jewel is for having found you, being able to wander through your archives while I field your new efforts. Fate has smiled on me. Glad to meet you.
        Until then,
        Dan

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Pingback: BADGES | dan4kent

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