Be Ye Not Desolate

White curtains flutter.
Breeze billows through fabric,
createing long cloth ripples
filled and unfilled by unseen wind.

Door left ajar.
The void space within its frame,
a vacancy that waits
filled with hope.

The null set.
Emptiness that knows,
change by one
changes everything.

1450506950396

Written for dVerse, a virtual poets’ pub, where Bjorn is tending bar today and asks us to write a quadrille (44 words, not including title) that makes use of the word jar. A bit of poetic license: did include a jar (ajar).

 

59 thoughts on “Be Ye Not Desolate

  1. BjΓΆrn Rudberg (brudberg) August 15, 2016 / 1:57 pm

    I hope there can always be a door ajar… there are days when not a single breeze is felt… there are days when doors are closed…. love the hope of this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 15, 2016 / 1:58 pm

      Thank you, Bjorn. Doors ajar always leave room for hope! πŸ™‚ Happy Monday to you!

      Like

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:21 am

      Kind of like the glass being half-full or half-empty, right? So even when it’s empty, it’s waiting for that pitcher to come it’s way….that’s hope!

      Like

      • Misky August 17, 2016 / 9:35 am

        And I am eternally hopeful by nature. πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  2. kanzensakura August 15, 2016 / 3:21 pm

    That door ajar – always giving hope unlike the door that is closed….and locked. I love the hope in this and the possibilities.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:23 am

      Glad you enjoyed! πŸ™‚ Smiling I am with my second cup. About to get to my reading….

      Like

  3. whimsygizmo August 15, 2016 / 3:23 pm

    Oh, Lill.
    THIS:
    “a vacancy that waits
    filled with hope.”

    We all have this. So lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:23 am

      Yes πŸ™‚ Even the half-empty glass has hope and simply is awaiting the pitcher!

      Like

  4. Carol J Forrester August 15, 2016 / 3:43 pm

    The imagery in that first stanza is beautiful, I could imagine just sitting next to that window watching the curtains move.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:24 am

      I do love breezy days and fluttering curtains! πŸ™‚

      Like

  5. Vinay Leo R. August 15, 2016 / 4:14 pm

    A possibility that the wind can come in to a room and leave its imprints. πŸ™‚ I love that hope. Beautiful.

    Agree with Carol too. I am sitting near an open window, so I could imagine the breeze through the curtains as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:24 am

      So very glad you enjoyed! Have a breezy day πŸ™‚

      Like

  6. freyathewriter August 15, 2016 / 4:42 pm

    Leaving that door ajar leaves us open to many possibilities, be the good or bad. We have our window open in this warm summer evening and I can hear birds (seagulls) fighting with distant traffic and the breeze. Letting the outside in.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:26 am

      Yes indeed. A door open to me, is the sign of hope and bravery — expect the best! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  7. sarahsouthwest August 15, 2016 / 4:47 pm

    I really like the way you keep the theme of openness running through the poem. It feels full of possibilities. The first stanza is so beautifully visualised, and then you move from that to something more abstract, but very gently. Lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:27 am

      Thank you Sarah for you very kind words here. Will be getting to my reading this morning…always enjoy the words of others over my morning coffee! πŸ™‚

      Like

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:27 am

      And I love to see your hearts in the morning, Sanaa. Happy Tuesday! πŸ™‚

      Like

  8. Bodhirose August 15, 2016 / 5:11 pm

    I love the beauty of the wind gently blowing a lightweight curtain and in that alone I feel hope. Lovely, Lillian.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:28 am

      The breeze of possibilities! πŸ™‚

      Like

  9. Raivenne August 15, 2016 / 6:07 pm

    I can visualize and all. but feel the breeze of the first stanza. The second stanza make my heart zing with – well, hope. The third stanza tempers that hope. Not to give up but to be prapared for not all changes are for the better.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:30 am

      I think for those who feel desolate, perhaps they feel stymied and stuck, empty. The null set simply stands awaiting to be filled – it too recognizes that change is imminent. For me….that is hope — movement in all manner — and as someone once said to me, “Expect the best!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:31 am

      Yes — now that would be something to write about — the variants of hope. Interesting….
      Thanks for your thoughtful read this morning.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Grace August 15, 2016 / 6:28 pm

    A lot of possibilities with the door left ajar Lillian. But I am always hopeful for anything that comes in. Good one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:31 am

      Yep — the half-full glass is simply waiting for the pitcher and in that, there is hope! πŸ™‚

      Like

  11. Pleasant Street August 15, 2016 / 7:11 pm

    Lillian this is so insightful and wonderful. I don’t know what prompted it for you, but for me reading it, it came on the heels of a sad poem that I wrote about a door ajar. Touched me deeply, thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:33 am

      So very glad you connected with this one. I tend to be a very positive person — my daughter accuses me of being a Pollyanna — which I actually take as a compliment. I like to be believe the half-full glass is simply waiting for the pitcher! πŸ™‚

      Like

  12. Waltermarks August 15, 2016 / 7:20 pm

    What a wondrfulvway to usher in hope, by a door ajar. Great imagery, got to open a door to let in the light

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:33 am

      The open door — let in the breeze, life, hope! Glad you enjoyed!

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:34 am

      So glad you enjoyed, Candy! Thanks for the read πŸ™‚

      Like

  13. Mish August 16, 2016 / 12:09 am

    I was carried off by the breeze in the first stanza…could totally visualize the ripples. From there, you captivated me with a lovely analogy of hope…a door even slightly ajar gives way to the light.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:36 am

      Thanks, Mish. Having just been in the Adirondaks with country curtains on windows and knotty pine walls, I kept thinking about those cool breezes and the curtains fluttering. Here in Boston, windows are closed and airconditioning is humming. Looking forward to a break in the humidity! πŸ™‚ But yes…..a door ajar, a window open, a glass half-empty awaiting the pitcher of cool water. Expect the best πŸ™‚

      Like

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:38 am

      Interesting — have not gotten very many comments about the last lines. For me, they made the sense of the poem — even the emptiness, the void, is simply waiting for an addition — a change. As I’ve said to others, the half-empty glass is simply awaiting the pitcher — that’s hope and turns that old phrase of How do you see the glass – half-full or half-empty? on its head! πŸ™‚

      Like

  14. kim881 August 16, 2016 / 3:42 am

    Snap! I started with a door left ajar too! I love those lines:
    ‘The void space within its frame,
    a vacancy that waits
    filled with hope.’

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:38 am

      So glad you enjoyed, Kim! WIll be off to my morning reading in just a few moments. Need to get my second cup! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:40 am

      Oh — so glad you commented on the last verse. Most folks did not.
      For me, it is the reality of mathematical theory — the null set. And to think about it as something simply awaiting an addition — a change — rather than a permanent emptiness — that is the key to hope.

      Like

      • Laura Bloomsbury August 16, 2016 / 8:06 am

        wonderful view of the {null set} – its what drew me most to your poem – we confuse void with emptiness rather than readiness πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  15. maria August 16, 2016 / 7:32 am

    “a vacancy that waits…” I love the tinge of hope in this piece. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 7:41 am

      Thank you, Maria. Yes — I think about the half-empty glass as simply awaiting the pitcher! That is hope πŸ™‚ As someone once said to me, Expect the Best!

      Like

  16. Bryan Ens August 16, 2016 / 9:10 am

    Great metaphor here. So often we come upon “doors” that are ajar, and we are given the choice to open, close, or leave alone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 9:13 am

      Yes indeed. A door left ajar is open for possibilities! πŸ™‚

      Like

  17. mother wintermoon August 16, 2016 / 5:16 pm

    Here’s to doors left ajar and maybe a mason jar full of pennies, keeping it ajar. πŸ™‚ Love this quadrille full of hope and beauty!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 16, 2016 / 8:30 pm

      Oh yes — a wonderful door stop (or should I say door go?) for this door that is full of possibilities! Glad you enjoyed.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Truedessa August 16, 2016 / 7:54 pm

    leave the door ajar so light might filter in and bring a breeze of joy…

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Rosemary Nissen-Wade August 17, 2016 / 8:29 am

    Intriguing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 17, 2016 / 9:34 am

      aha! Got you thinking???? πŸ™‚

      Like

  20. Sue Anderson August 19, 2016 / 12:53 am

    Hope is a theme for me lately. I liked your take on it.

    Like

    • lillian August 20, 2016 / 12:04 pm

      Thank you, Sue. Truly appreciate your reply!

      Like

  21. Mary August 20, 2016 / 1:48 pm

    “A vacancy that waits filled with hope” – I enjoyed thinking about this. Often we think of a vacancy as being nothingness, but as I read your poem I realize there has to be ‘nothingness’ before something can fill it. Thus, a hopeful thought here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian August 20, 2016 / 1:52 pm

      Exactly! I’d always heard the question, “How to you view life? As a glass half-full or a glass half-empty?” with the assumption that the one who sees it half-empty is a pessimist. In reality, when you think about it, both are positive! As in, the one who sees it half-empty is swiply aware that hope is around the corner and is contemplating what to put into the glass. Hope can be present if we choose to see it that way! πŸ™‚

      Like

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