Still Life

Paint me a rose garden
petal by petal
thorn by thorn
a microcosm of life.

A primrose kind of gal
petite with pastel temper,
wed to a brooding man,
morose and prickly by nature.
They live in a rosemål house,
flowers etched in love.

Rosemaling+Petersburg+Alaska
It’s quadrille Monday at dVerse Poets’ Pub with Bjorn tending bar. He asks us to write a quadrille (poem of 44 words) using the word rose (primrose, morose, rosemal). Photo is an example of the Norwegian art of rosemal. 

 

59 thoughts on “Still Life

    • lillian June 27, 2016 / 3:13 pm

      I have two beautiful tiny sled Christmas ornaments, hand rosemaled by my dear friend’s mother…so beautiful! A truly wonderful Scandinavian folk art and yes….we hope these lovely paintings inside their home erases the mo from the morose! 🙂

      Like

  1. Grace June 27, 2016 / 3:17 pm

    I specially admire how you describe the gal:

    A primrose kind of gal
    petite with pastel temper

    Such a lovely work capturing that still life of flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 27, 2016 / 3:26 pm

      Thank you, Grace. Kind words much appreciated! 🙂

      Like

    • lillian June 27, 2016 / 5:37 pm

      Oh thanks, Jilly. Chuckling I am! I am indeed married to a Swede 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • jillys2016 June 27, 2016 / 5:49 pm

        They can be a brooding sort – both my husband and I are of that bent. He is 1/4 Norwegian. We try not to brood simultaneously!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. kanzensakura June 27, 2016 / 4:04 pm

    Living in a rosemal house – wonderful! And the primrose kind of gal – yes, I would say that. Hopefully your smiles will erase the mo and change it to rosy! Great poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. sarahsouthwest June 27, 2016 / 4:16 pm

    I do like your choice of words, and the way the theme runs through the poem. And I can see this couple. I think I might have met them at a party once…

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 27, 2016 / 5:38 pm

      ….smiling I am at your reply! So glad you enjoyed.

      Like

    • lillian June 27, 2016 / 5:40 pm

      oooh, thank you for the link! Very fun indeed. And so glad you enjoyed the poem.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Charley June 27, 2016 / 4:33 pm

    Ja, we Scandinavians have reason to brood — no Tabasco! Your poem nicely connected two realities and painted more than the roses.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 27, 2016 / 5:41 pm

      It’s that lutefisk and all that white sauce!!! No wonder they decorate their homes with rosemal 🙂 So glad you enjoyed! Tak sa mycket!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Charley June 27, 2016 / 5:53 pm

        Don’t forget the Lutheran manna. Campbells’ will do.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Victoria C. Slotto June 27, 2016 / 7:29 pm

    Oooh–I know a couple like that! And he’s Scandinavian. For years I suffered through Lutefisk on Christmas eve until I finally told him “enough!” Now I get lobster tail. Poor me. And last year he finally followed suit. :0)

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 6:11 am

      George’s dad and grandfather used to serve lutefisk..ugh. I still make Swedish pancakes though — and yes, we put ligonberries over them. Also enjoy the potato sausage they make. Did you ever have homemade glug?

      Like

      • Victoria C. Slotto June 28, 2016 / 12:52 pm

        Not that I know of. We were at Host Fest in Minot this last year…I saw a lot of stuff that could be described as glug.😄

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Bodhirose June 27, 2016 / 7:46 pm

    Brilliant how you incorporated all of those “roses” in your poem, Lillian. Rosemal is so very pretty…a quite feminine art form.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. thotpurge June 27, 2016 / 9:20 pm

    Microcosm of life… so true, beauty and thorns together complementing each other.

    Like

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 6:12 am

      All that prickly beauty in a rose! 🙂

      Like

  8. lynn__ June 27, 2016 / 11:44 pm

    Lovely little microcosm of life…your words are artistry!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 6:12 am

      Thank you, Lynn. So glad you enjoyed! Nice to read your words here during my first morning cup! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Mish June 27, 2016 / 11:54 pm

    I admire all the forms of “rose” that you’ve woven into your quadrille so seamlessly. Favourite part is “A primrose kind of gal
    petite with pastel temper”
    Oh my, how cool is that!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 6:13 am

      Always good to see your complimentary words, Mish. Truly appreciated! 🙂

      Like

  10. maria June 28, 2016 / 12:52 am

    “Flowers etched in love…”~ Awwee I find this piece very sweet! Beautifully penned, Lillian. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 6:14 am

      Smiling I am, Maria. Nice to see you this morning! 🙂

      Like

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 6:14 am

      So happy you enjoyed, Josslyn. This was a fun one to write! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 9:02 am

      Smiling I am at your comment here😊

      Like

  11. Bryan Ens June 28, 2016 / 8:34 am

    I’m glad you included the artwork. I had no idea what “rosemal” meant, although I have seen that style of art before (now I have a name to put with it!). Clever usages of the prompt word!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 9:01 am

      It’s a very traditional folkloric type of Scandinavian art work. Glad you enjoyed!

      Like

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 10:18 am

      Oh, so appreciate your words Walter. Grandkids arriving soon for a few days. Will read more tonight after their bedtime 😊

      Like

  12. Linda Kruschke June 28, 2016 / 10:03 am

    Well done. I do like how you worked in variations of rose, though I don’t know what a rosemål house is.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 28, 2016 / 10:16 am

      Rosmal is a Scandinavian art form (like the image I’ve posted). Often folks do this art work on ceiling borders, wood work, window frames, decorative plates and candle stick holders. There are predominately red designs for Christmas – some favor the wedgewood blue background. Predominately floral designs.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lillian July 3, 2016 / 3:11 am

      Glad you enjoyed! Have had some lovely days with grandchildren’s visit. Up for a bit with some insomnia — shall be reading at dVerse in the morning. So late to these responses and my reading. But I shall get there!

      Like

  13. kim881 June 28, 2016 / 3:54 pm

    Me too! Love the ‘primrose kind of gal’ and the rosemål house, I also have a husband like that:brooding … morose and prickly by nature.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian July 3, 2016 / 3:11 am

      Don’t you love the word “prickly?” Just sounds like that mood, right? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Truedessa June 28, 2016 / 8:37 pm

    I liked the last two lines best, I wonder what a house like that would be like. Flowering all the time.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian July 3, 2016 / 3:13 am

      I think this type of folkart is very very cheerful! 🙂 Perhaps those Scandinavians enjoy bringing the light into the house with this type of art.

      Like

  15. Rosemary Nissen-Wade June 29, 2016 / 12:15 am

    It’s a pretty art – as is your poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. daa1915 June 29, 2016 / 2:28 pm

    I’m a Swede myself. Of course, I never brood.
    I leave that to my husband, the Danish Norwegian.

    😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian July 3, 2016 / 3:14 am

      Oh chuckling I am, at your reply here. 🙂 Glad you enjoyed my bit of folkart here!

      Like

    • lillian July 3, 2016 / 3:14 am

      I’m often in a rosey mood! Glad you enjoyed 🙂

      Like

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