Elegy

Father to five, beloved son,
you left far too suddenly.
Unable to escape or run,
knees buckled at Death’s glee.

And we were left behind in shock,
screams and rampant grief.
Angry words turned empty talk,
echoed wails with no relief.

Standing graveside, stooped in loss,
tears drenched with memories
fell upon your coffin etched with cross,
placed ‘neath quaking Aspen trees.

Rest now, my brother dear
and know that we are well.
Your children’s children keep you near,
and their children shall as well.

For all their hopes in future years
their smiles, their deeds in numbers swell,
all of these my brother dear
your legacy do tell.

IMG_4551

Written for dVerse — asking us to do an elegy today.
Photo is my brother, nine years older than me, died far too young at 51. Gone more than twenty years, I still miss him.

31 thoughts on “Elegy

  1. Björn Rudberg (brudberg) June 2, 2016 / 3:07 pm

    Oh Lilian, to die at 51.. yes far too young and with a family left… it must have been so hard.. and after 20 years you will still feel him (and maybe see his face in his children…) Wonderful elegy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:15 am

      Thank you, Bjorn. I do stay in touch with my sister-in-law and his children. He would have been 78 this year. Sadly he missed seeing any of his grandchildren — and now there is even a great grandchild. I’m so glad you enjoyed — although “enjoyed” seems an odd word to write for an elegy.

      Like

  2. Bodhirose June 2, 2016 / 3:17 pm

    Lillian, I’m so sorry for the loss of your brother…a handsome man, taken way too young. Your words tell of such sorrow at his passing and the legacy of his children left behind who will carry on his love of family. Beautifully heartfelt elegy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:16 am

      Thank you. Heartfelt is a good word for an elegy — I will begin my reading of everyone’s a bit later this morning. Seems odd to push a “like” button for an elegy.

      Like

  3. freyathewriter June 2, 2016 / 3:56 pm

    Lovely, Lillian. 51 is far too young (my dad was 60 and I felt that was too young as well). This was so beautifully written. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:17 am

      It turns out many of us have had “far too young” losses. I read once a statement similar to this one: “Fifty-one is far too young for angel wings.” I really don’t know what would be the end-number for this sentence.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Glenn Buttkus June 2, 2016 / 4:29 pm

    Mother died at 39, father at 55–death cares not if one has had a “full” life. Your elegy smacks of perfection & touching emotionalism. I am finding the elegies do end with an upbeat but still, the subject weighs heavy on my heart today.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:20 am

      I will be reading this morning after our 5-day guests leave. I suspect this will be heavy reading.
      To lose a mother at 39 and a father at 55 seems doubly cruel. Robbed of life and oh so many things they are.

      Like

  5. Grace June 2, 2016 / 5:31 pm

    Too young to die but his legacy will live on with the children ~ Thanks for the moving personal share ~

    Liked by 1 person

  6. whimsygizmo June 2, 2016 / 7:44 pm

    Oh, Lill. I am so sorry for your loss. This is a beautiful, touching tribute.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:21 am

      Seems so odd to press the “like” button here. I found the form a tough one — but for me, the rhyming is always tough. But this time, the emotional aspect of the writing as well as the rational.

      Like

  7. Sumana Roy June 3, 2016 / 2:06 am

    : so sorry for your loss…this is so tragic to lose a loved one at 51… yet the poem’s so beautiful, specially to think of the legacy to continue…

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:21 am

      Thankyou for your thoughtful comment here. Truly appreciated.

      Like

  8. NJ June 3, 2016 / 6:03 am

    Every post I’ve been reading for this prompt has been so heart-wrenching. I am so sorry for your loss, dear Lillian. Losing someone at any age is so darn tough. The tribute for him is perfect and may his legacy be carried on forever…

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 3, 2016 / 6:23 am

      Yes — we’ve had company for five days which has curtailed my usual reading (I almost always read everyone’s post) — so I shall begin a bit later this morning after their departure. I think I may need a glass of wine instead of coffee to make it through this read. When the topic is elegy, and one is reading two let alone 20 or more — it makes for a tough read. Thank you for your thoughts here — and for your read. It was a difficult day/week/loss.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie Roselli-Kissack June 3, 2016 / 11:55 am

    Oh, Lillian
    a gorgeously moving tribute, your beautiful words are as alive as your brother’s spirit
    I don’t doubt that his honorable character takes up grand space in each one of his children
    I’m sorry you have this pain – he was too young
    am:)

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 4, 2016 / 8:19 am

      Thank you AnnMarie. Just getting to my reading this morning — shall be catching up with you.
      He was a special guy.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Walt Wojtanik June 3, 2016 / 2:29 pm

    The words you gather in your brother’s honor are heart-weighted and strong. All these years past the bar, we grieve along with you! Echoing the same: Too young!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 4, 2016 / 8:19 am

      Thank you, Walt. This prompt was a weighty one.

      Like

  11. Nan Mykel June 3, 2016 / 11:15 pm

    “Death’s glee” says a lot. So sorry for your loss but admire your ability to reflect on it in such a positive manner.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 4, 2016 / 8:21 am

      Thank you, Nan. He was my only sibling. It’s odd to think that I am the only one left of my immediate family. And in fact, when I look at my entire family, I realize there is no one left who remembers me from birth. Odd to realize that….

      Like

    • lillian June 4, 2016 / 8:22 am

      Thank you for your kind words here. This prompt was a weighty one — I’ve found myself having to stretch the readings out with breaks – so powerful and emotional are the words of so many.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Mish June 4, 2016 / 8:14 am

    I am so sorry for your loss, Lillian. This is a very moving elegy for your dear brother. The rhyme is not contrived and it has a beautiful flow. I can definitely relate to your shock and grief, losing my only brother suddenly at 36. Wishing you peace and comfort in all the sweet memories.

    And wow…what a smile he had!
    (((hugs)))

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 4, 2016 / 8:24 am

      So truly special to read your words this morning….36 is far far too young. I find myself thinking of him when I see my grandchildren…and realizing he missed so much of his life. I just mentioned to another — odd to think there is no one left on this earth who knew me from my infancy…
      Thank you for your very kind words here, m friend.

      Like

  13. Sherry Marr June 4, 2016 / 2:06 pm

    Oh, he died too young. He looks so fit and active and vital in the photo. What a loss. A beautiful tribute to him. I love “your children’s children keep you near.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 6, 2016 / 6:34 am

      A massive heart attack while jogging at the gym – shocking for those left behind but we hope no pain for him. Too many are too young for angel wings.

      Like

  14. kim881 June 5, 2016 / 2:51 am

    I am so sorry to hear that you lost your brother at such a young age, Lillian. The memories will never fade. Such poignant phrasing in the opening stanza and the lines:
    ‘Unable to escape or run,
    knees buckled at Death’s glee.’

    Liked by 1 person

    • lillian June 6, 2016 / 6:33 am

      I still miss him, after all these years. Thank you for your kind words.

      Liked by 1 person

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